Laurel Fields, Potters Bar, Herts EN6 2BA

01707 652714

admin@cranborne.herts.sch.uk

A Big Welcome to all of our new Nursery children starting their new adventure at Cranborne this week!

Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium is an allocation of funds to children currently in receipt of free school meals or have been eligible for free school meals in the last 6 years. It also includes children of service men or women and those children looked after. Although these resources are targeted to PPG children, they are accessible to all pupils where necessary.

If you think your child is entitled to free school meals (whether you want them to eat them or not) then please let us know.

Every year we are in receipt of Pupil Premium funding. This runs with the financial year and we have to report on the impact it has had on the academic year. We also have to outline how we intend to spend our funding for the following year. Please see Pupil Premium Strategy 2016-2017.

During 2015/2016 we continued to develop our specialist Pupil Premium Team consisting of experienced teachers and teaching assistants. Class Teachers are able to request targeted provision on a weekly basis as well as some continual longer term provision. The team is led by Mrs Keilty who is responsible for Inclusion.  

 

Annual Report to Parents 2015/2016

Number of pupils and pupil premium grant (PPG) received

 

Total number of pupils on roll = 432

Total number of pupils eligible for PPG = 53

Amount of PPG received per pupil = £1320

Total amount of PPG received = £70,000

 

Summary of PPG spending 2015/2016 

Objectives in spending PPG:

  • To secure at least expected progress in English and Maths in terms of points (yrs2,6) and steps (yrs1,3,4,5)
  • To narrow the gap in attainment and achievement between PP and non PP children
  • To build self-confidence, self-esteem and readiness for learning in order to raise attainment and progress

 

Summary of spending and actions taken (see 2015-2016 financial breakdown for further details):

 

Targeted Teaching by Pupil Premium Teacher – every afternoon with Key Stage 2 children

Targeted Teaching by Pupil Premium Teacher – every afternoon with Key Stage 1 children

Inco leader pupil premium focus (1 day a week) – overseeing provision and practise within team

Targeted Teaching Assistant Team – dedicated targeted support across KS1 and 2

Learning Mentor – pastoral support and nurture programmes for vulnerable children

Learning Club – morning club with priority given for PP children

Extra Curricular Clubs -after school club, breakfast club and sports etc

Booster – maths booster for year 6 children

Resources to enhance learning and development

 

Key:

 Disadvantaged children/Pupil Premium/Ever 6 FSM - these terms are interchangeable in this report

 Disadvantaged – these children qualify for FSM and therefore become a ‘pupil premium’ child.

DSEN - Disability and Special Educational Needs

Pure Pupil Premium - Pupil Premium children excluding DSEN

 

Outcomes at end of Key Stage 2 (Year 6):

 

Comparison in attainment between Disadvantaged and Non-Disadvantaged Pupils:

(Refer to both the % achieving ‘expected’ and to the average scaled score)

 

Disadvantaged (11)

Disadvantaged

Attainment

 

Non-Disadvantaged

Attainment

Comments

Reading

11 (100%)       100

42 (86%)      

Positive gap

Writing

10 (91%)

45 (92%)

No gap

Maths

9 (82%)           102.9

43 (88%)       105.9

6% gap (1 Pupil premium child difference) Scaled score shows slight higher average attainment.

GPVS

9 (82%)           104.5

45 (92%)       107.1

10% gap (1 pupil premium child difference Scaled score shows slight higher average attainment.

 

 

Comparison in Progress between Disadvantaged and Non-Disadvantaged Pupils:

(0 = Average progress, with + or - indicating the school's performance against the average)

 

 

Disadvantaged Progress

Non Disadvantaged Progress

Comments

Reading

+2.1

+2.3

Similar progress

Writing

+1.8

+1.3

Pupil Premium stronger

Maths

+1.1

+1.7

Non – PP stronger.

 

 

The gap is closing at Year 6 for Pupil Premium in attainment because there is no gap in writing and a positive gap in reading. The progress shows that in reading and writing the pupil premium children do as well as their peers.

 

Pupil premium didn’t do as well as their peers in maths and GPVS but this gap refers to 1 child.

 

Comparison in Progress between Disadvantaged and Non-Disadvantaged Pupils When removing SEND children:

 (0 = Average progress, with + or - indicating the school's performance against the average)

 

Without SEND

Disadvantaged Progress

Non Disadvantaged Progress

Comments

Reading

+2.0

+2.3

Similar progress

Writing

+4.1

+1.3

Pupil Premium stronger

Maths

+1.9

+1.7

PP stronger.

 

 Outcomes at end of Key Stage 1 (Year 2):

 

Comparison in attainment between Disadvantaged and Non-Disadvantaged Pupils:

(Refers to the % achieving ‘expected+’)

Disadvantaged (7) working at Expected

Disadvantaged Expected

Non-Disadvantaged

Expected

Comments

Reading

6 (86%)

51 (96%)

1 PP child is the gap.

Writing

5 (71%)

43 (81%)

1 PP child is the gap.

Maths

7 (100%)

45 (85%)

Positive gap for PP

RWM combined

5 (71%)

40 (76%)

Gap again 1 child.

 

Children working at expected is similar for pupil premium and non pupil premium. Where a gap exists it is one child that is equivalent to the gap (who is also SEN, Prior LA and Summer Birthday) – the low numbers skew this slightly.

(Refers to to the % achieving ‘greater depth’)

Disadvantaged (7) working at Greater Depth

Disadvantaged Greater Depth

Non-Disadvantaged

Greater Depth

Comments

Reading

1 (14%)

22 (41%)

1 PP child at greater depth

Writing

1 (14%)

12 (23%)

1 PP child at greater depth

Maths

1 (14%)

20 (38%)

1 PP child at greater depth

RWM combined

1 (14%)

12 (23%)

1 PP child at greater depth

 

Attainment for Pupil Premium is almost as good as non pupil premium at expected (1 child difference who is also SEN, summer birthday and previous low attainment group.)

 

 Outcomes at end of Foundation Stage (Reception)

 

Comparison in ARE in C&L between Disadvantaged and Non-Disadvantaged Pupils:

 

Communication and Language

Pupil Premium (5)/(Non Pupil Premium)

Listening and Attention

Understanding

Speaking

Progress

Expected

100% (85.7%)

100% (87.5%)

100% (89.3%)

100% (78.6%)

Better than Expected

20% (32.1%)

20% (32.1%)

20% (32.1%)

40% (46.4%)

 

All PP children made expected standard and progress which is better than non-pupil premium.

The difference at exceeding is marginal because of proportions of pupils are low in PP.

 

Comparison in ARE in PD between Disadvantaged and Non-Disadvantaged Pupils:

 

Physical Development

 

Pupil Premium (5)/(Non Pupil Premium)

Moving and Handling

Health and Safe Care

Overall PD

Progress

Expected

100% (89.3%)

100% (91.1%)

89.2%

100% (82.1%)

Better than Expected

0% (19.6%)

20% (28.6%)

 

 

 

Pupil Premium better than Non PP at expected standards and progress.

One child difference at exceeding for moving and handling (proportions with percentage of PP group 1ch=20%)

Comparison in ARE in PSED between Disadvantaged and Non-Disadvantaged Pupils:

 

Personal Social Emotional Development

Pupil Premium/Non (Pupil Premium)

Self confidence and awareness

Managing feelings and behaviour

Making relationships

Overall

Progress

Expected

100% (92.9%)

100% (85.7%)

100%  (87.5%)

100%

100% (87.5%)

Better than Expected

20% (21.4%)

20% (25%)

20% (19.6%)

 

 

 

Pupil Premium higher than Non Pupil Premium at expected and in line at exceeding expectations.

 

Outcomes in other year groups (comparison is within school – not against national)

Year 1

PP

Non PP

Attainment

 

 

Reading

A1

A2

Writing

A1

A2

Maths

A1

A2

Progress

 

 

Reading

4.8

4.3

Writing

4.6

4.0

Maths

4.6

4.2

 

  • PP children are below non PP in attainment
  • Progress for PP children is above non PP

 

Year 3

PP

Non PP

Attainment

 

 

Reading

A6/B1

B2

Writing

A6

B2

Maths

A6

B2

Progress

 

 

Reading

2.1

2.8

Writing

2.3

2.7

Maths

2.1

2.7

 

  • Attainment for PP children is below non PP (2 terms)

 

Year 4

PP

Non PP

Attainment

 

 

Reading

B3/B4

B4/B5

Writing

B3/B4

B4/B5

Maths

B3/B4

B4/B5

Progress

 

 

Reading

5.1

5.6

Writing

4.9

5.6

Maths

5.1

5.5

 

  • Attainment for PP children is below non PP (1 term)

 

Year 5

PP

Non PP

Attainment

 

 

Reading

C1

C1/C2

Writing

C1

C2

Maths

C1

C2

Progress

 

 

Reading

8.5

8.8

Writing

9.0

9.4

Maths

8.3

9.1

 

  • Attainment for Pupil Premium is below Non Pupil Premium
  • Progress for Pupil Premium is broadly in line for Reading and writing, however below for maths
  • Attainment and Progress for Pure PP is in line or above non PP

Key findings Pupil Premium:

  1. At key stage 1 (yr 2), children working at the expected level is similar for pupil premium and non pupil premium. Where a gap exists, it is one child that is equivalent to the gap – the low numbers skew this slightly.
  2. Still an in school attainment and slight progress gap in years 3,4 and 5
  3. Progress and attainment for pure PP is in line or better than PP in years 1,5, and 6
  4. Attainment at year 6 for PP children is likely to be above national in all measures
  5. The gap is closing at Year 6 for Pupil Premium in attainment because there is no gap in writing and a positive gap in reading. The progress shows that in reading and writing the pupil premium children do as well as their peers.
  6. At year 6, Pupil premium didn’t do as well as their peers in maths and GPVS but in this context we are talking about 1 child who has been experiencing some major challenges
  7. Attainment at yr 6 for pure PP (exc SEN) is either in line or better than non-PP
  8. Year 1 progress is in line or better
  9. All PP children in Reception achieved the ELG and therefore their attainment and progress as a group was 100% 

 

So what now? (See Inclusion Action Plan)

  1. Identified children who are significantly below – these are affecting the data massively. These children have been targeted for intensive support during the Autumn term
  2. Sue Jones to work with a group of current year 4 children
  3. Recruited an experienced Teaching Assistant to work with current year 5 children – this is a large cohort
  4. Induction for new member of staff is complete. Training has begun with PP Teacher. Further training has been identified and booked (independent writing and editing)
  5. All PP staff to attend pupil progress meetings
  6. Logs to be slimmed down so that the recording is beneficial and not onerous
  7. All PP staff attended OSIRIS outstanding teaching INSET
  8. Focus in on engaging pupils in order to promote retention
  9. Organise trips for PP children – real life experiences which can then be followed up at school
  10. More able PP children to be challenged during Spring/Summer term
  11. Getting to know you sessions are complete – aim is to promote pupil accountability and responsibility for their learning
  12. Coaching of class TAs to be arranged with regards to meeting the needs of PP during class time
  13. Use assembly, break and lunchtimes to liaise with teachers and TAs regarding tailor made support
  14. Ensure effective communication with parents through email, telephone, coffee mornings, meetings, workshops and written correspondence
  15. Continue to offer training and a package of support to other schools in order to raise attainment and enhance progress locally

 

Other impact measures                                                     

  • Children report that they feel they are listened to and can share their problems (learning mentor questionnaires)
  • Parental engagement is higher and reputation of the school is very good – particularly around nurturing children and meeting their individual needs
  • Teachers report that behaviour incidents at lunchtime are dealt with more effectively, meaning less learning time is wasted
  • Teachers also report that there are less interruptions during lunchtime, meaning teachers are better prepared for the afternoon sessions
  • External professionals report that our pastoral care and provision for disadvantaged pupils is of very high quality (email correspondence, core group minutes, secondary school handover meetings)
  • Better communication between team members and a cohesive approach to individuals’ learning